Hassan II Mosque Photo Tour

During our stay in Casablanca we visited the Hassan II Mosque twice, once just to enjoy the exterior and walk along the coast and the other to take the tour. At 120dh per person we were hesitant about taking the tour, but we’re so glad we did. Not only was our guide very informative and entertaining, but it was amazing to have the opportunity to enter such a grand mosque. Most of the mosques in the world are not open to non-Muslim visitors, so this stop offers quite a unique treat.

There are a lot of interesting facts concerning the construction of the building, but I wont bore you with all that (click here for the Wikipedia page). Instead I’d like to take a moment to share some of our favorite photos (click on any photo to see it larger):

The mosque with the large public square in front of it. Impressive, even from this distance.

Getting a little closer, you begin to get a sense of how large the thing is. You can see some people near the base of it for scale.

The minaret from close up - 650+ feet tall with intricate tilework all along its length. There's a laser at the top that points toward Mecca.

The minaret from close up – 650+ feet tall with intricate tilework all along its length. There’s a laser at the top that points toward Mecca.

Engraved brass and titanium doors leading to the mosque. The larger ones weigh 10 tons and are operated electrically.

Engraved brass and titanium doors leading to the mosque. The larger ones weigh 10 tons and are operated electrically.

Wider view of some of the doorways, note the tilework over the tops of the doors.

Wider view of some of the doorways, note the tilework over the tops of the doors.

Around the exterior of the mosque are about 10 fountains like this one with awesome tiled designs. Oh, and they're huge.

Around the exterior of the mosque are about 10 fountains like this one with awesome tiled designs. Oh, and they’re huge.

A close-up of the tiles in the fountain.

A close-up of the tiles in the fountain.

In addition to those fountains, there are about 5 of these fountains in the courtyard.

In addition to those fountains, there are about 5 of these fountains in the courtyard.

Oh look, more awesome tiles on the exterior of the building.

Oh look, more awesome tiles on the exterior of the building.

Heading inside, you're greeted with the enormous space that houses 25,000 worshipers. Only about 1/3 of the space is visible in this picture.

Heading inside, you’re greeted with the enormous space that houses 25,000 worshipers. Only about 1/3 of the space is visible in this picture.

Lighting from the windows and doors casts dramatic shadows.

Hand-carved cedar upper-deck where the women are seated during worship. This deck holds about 5,000 people.

Hand-carved cedar upper-deck where the women are seated during worship. This deck holds about 5,000 people.

Sunlight coming through the huge doors and windows facing the Atlantic Ocean.

Sunlight coming through the huge doors and windows facing the Atlantic Ocean.

Heading down to the basement, you are greeted with decorative engraved titanium overlayed on polished titanium.

The stairway down is lit by several of these massive titanium and brass chandeliers.

The stairway down is lit by several of these massive titanium and brass chandeliers.

Downstairs are the abloution rooms where ritual washing is done prior to prayer. This is the women’s room, there’s an identical one for men on the other side of the building.

Chandeliers and a skylight in the abloutions room. Water for washing comes out of the top of the huge marble "flowers".

Chandeliers and a skylight in the abloutions room. Water for washing comes out of the top of the huge marble “flowers”.

In the basement are also two hammams (Turkish Baths), one each for men and women. They are not used, but are just to show tourists what a hammam is like.

The hammam is ringed with decorative tile inlay work.

After exiting the mosque, you’re treated with a fine view of the Atlantic and the southern coast of Casablanca.

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